Tag Archives: Sclera

Cosmetic Eye Fashion – Eye Tattoos and Eye Jewelry

JewelEye Cosmetic Eye Charm

JewelEye Cosmetic Eye Charm

OK…now we’ve seen some interesting things here at Visionary Eyecare…but, this stuff really takes the cake!

Eyeball  Jewelry and Eyeball Tattoos….now we’ve seen everything!

These cosmetic eye fashion procedures take the phrase “Beauty is in the Eye of the Beholder” to a completely new level….

Apparently, there is a company called JewelEye that makes cosmetic 3.5mm eye jewelry platinum implants in the shape of a heart or a half moon.  The implant is inserted beneath the conjunctiva (which is the “skin” that covers the white of the eye) yet, on top of the sclera (which is the “white” of the eye).

WARNING THE VIDEO BELOW IS VERY GRAPHIC –

EYE SURGICAL PROCEDURE

Although Dutch eye surgeons at the Netherlands Institute for Innovative Ocular Surgery perform this 15 minute patented procedure (they say that they actually have a waiting list), in 2004 the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) spoke out against this type of cosmetic implant. An AAO member stated that these implants may cause scar tissue or allow bacteria to get under the conjunctiva which could erode the sclera (the white of the eye) or cause other vision threatening infections. The AAO commented that if these problems ocured – then it could become very difficult to remove the implant.

Another problem is that the conjunctiva is loosely attached to the sclera – so by placing an implant under the conjunctiva…in time, the implant may move around and not stay in place. This could irritate the patient’s eye and possibly cause vision problems.

Eyeball Tattoo

Eyeball Tattoo

And another cosmetic eye procedure is the Eyeball Tattoo.  Much like the JewelEye implant…the tattoo ink is inserted bewteen the sclera and the conjunctiva (the white of the eye and the skin that covers it) with a needle.

(Warning: Graphic Photos) CLICK HERE

TO SEE PHOTOS OF THE PROCEDURE

This procedure looks like it is being done in a tattoo parlor – which is a not a sterile operating room. The risk of infection is very high – which can lead to visual impairment.

Also, a needle being used that close to an eye in a surgically untrained hand can be very dangerous.   One slip and the needle could scratch the front of the eye (the cornea).   Worse yet,  the needle could penetrate the eye – causing a retinal detachment which is vision threatening OR it could cause an infection inside the eye  – which could lead to loss of the eye.

WARNING – THE VIDEOS BELOW ARE VERY GRAPHIC!!

Again, most eye doctors would advise NOT to have this procedure done – the multitude of  RISKS FAR OUTWEIGH any positive cosmetic benefit.

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One Cause of Red Eye – Subconjunctival Hemorrhage

“I woke up this morning and my eye was really red – like there was blood on the white of my eye!”

This is a very frightening looking condition affecting patients.  They come in with a  red eye – like a bright red blood patch on the white of their eye –  but, there is no pain, discharge or blurriness to their vision.   Sometimes the eye may feel a little bit “scratchy” or irritated but, that is usually rare.  Sometimes they are caused by trauma to the eye but, most of the time they occur without any injury sustained to the eye – they just seem to appear “out of nowhere”.

It is called a Subconjunctival Hemorrhage – or “Subconj Heme” for short.  It is caused when one of the tiny blood vessels on the white of your eye ruptures and that tiny drop of blood gets trapped between the white of your eye (the sclera) and the clear skin that covers the sclera (called the conjunctiva).  Sometimes this blood vessel breakage can be caused by a strong cough, vomiting, lifting something heavy, constipation strain, a stong sneeze etc.  This “trapped” blood usually takes about 7-14 days to clear up.  It is sort of like a bruise under the skin (but here the “skin” is the clear conjunctiva)….first the color is red and bright then over time it may turn different colors over time and become a bit yellowish before it completely clears up.

If you are on a “blood thinning” medication – it can cause the blood vessel to take a longer time to stop bleeding and a small blood spot can quickly become a much larger one due to the delay in clotting.  Many times a patient may be taking aspirin, coumadin or warfarin (these are blood thinning oral medications) or some type of herbs that can cause cause blood thinning and bleeding risks like St John’s Wort, Cayenne Pepper, Garlic, Ginger and Ginkgo.  People with high blood pressure and/or diabetes can also be at higher risk for developing a “Subconj Heme”.

It is always a good idea to go to see your eye doctor if you have a red eye and think you may  have a subconjunctival hemorrhage.  Many red eyes look alike and the doctor can tell you if you really have a subconj heme or if the redness is being caused by an eye infection or other serious condition.  If it is a subconj heme then the doctor can determine if you need to be sent for further investigation of possible blood/bleeding disorders.

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